The American Way of Birth: Why Do Republicans Hate It? – NYTimes.com

The American Way of Birth: Why Do Republicans Hate It? – NYTimes.com.

I think Lawrence Downes is off on the wrong rampage supporting the 14th amendment, to put it politely. The 14th amendment says any child born here is automatically a citizen. It was important after the Civil War, to protect ex-slaves.

World population has grown since the end of WW II from 2 Billion to 7 Billion. The US needs a much better safety net, but not for all the unemployed of the earth. We need to close our borders, and reduce income inequality, create jobs for the poor and minorities, strapped with police records and jail time. But other countries should take care of their own over population problem. The US should help other nations with sustainable development as much as we can. It is weird and improper, that Chinese fly to Los Angeles to have their babies, and then fly back to China. I am not a right wing quack, I am a moderate Independent, who is quacking harder and harder about climate change,  sustainability and what is now called the 6th great extinction of species, which is caused by an over abundance of humans.

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Nichholas Kristof in NYT: When Baltimore Burned

Saint Nich:”We’ve had months of police incidents touching on a delicate subtext of race, but it’s not clear that we’re learning lessons. Once again, I suggest that it’s time for a Truth and Reconciliation Commission to step back and explore racial inequity in America.

The real crisis isn’t one night of young men in the street rioting. It’s something perhaps even more inexcusable — our own complacency at the systematic long-term denial of equal opportunity to people based on their skin color and ZIP code.”

The real crisis isn’t one night of young men in the street rioting, it’s our long-term denial of equal opportunity to people based on their skin color and ZIP code.
nytimes.com|By Nicholas Kristof

Charles Blow on Violence in Baltimore

Charles Blow in the NYT: “We can’t rush to label violent protesters as “thugs” while reserving judgment about the violence of police killings until a full investigation has been completed and all the facts are in.”

You could argue that the rage was misdirected, and you would be right. But misdirected rage is not necessarily illegitimate rage.
nytimes.com|By Charles M. Blow

NYT: California Governor Orders New Target for Emissions Cuts

NYT:”Under Mr. Brown’s order, by 2030, emission levels will have to be reduced by 40 percent compared with 1990.”

Gov. Jerry Brown issued an executive order Wednesday dramatically ramping up the state’s already ambitious program aimed at curbing greenhouse gas emissions.
nytimes.com|By ADAM NAGOURNEY

Pope Francis is about to publish his Encyclical on Climate Change!

Pope Francis is about to publish his Encyclical on Climate Change!
Here’s the opening section (from the final draft):

Unsustainable consumption coupled with a record human population and the uses of inappropriate technologies are causally linked with the destruction of the world’s sustainability and resilience. Widening inequalities of wealth and income, the world-wide disruption of the physical climate system and the loss of millions of species that sustain life are the grossest manifestations of unsustainability. The continued extraction of coal, oil and gas following the “business-as-usual mode” will soon create grave existential risks for the poorest three billion, and for generations yet unborn. Climate change resulting largely from unsustainable consumption by about 15% of the world’s population has become a dominant moral and ethical issue for society. There is still time to mitigate unmanageable climate changes and repair ecosystem damages, provided we reorient our attitude toward nature and, thereby, toward ourselves. Climate change is a global problem whose solution will depend on our stepping beyond national affiliations and coming together for the common good. Such transformational changes in attitudes would help foster the necessary institutional reforms and technological innovations for providing the energy sources that have negligible effect on global climate, atmospheric pollution and eco-systems, thus protecting generations yet to be born. Religious institutions can and should take the lead in bringing about that change in attitude towards Creation.

The Catholic Church, working with the leadership of other religions, can now take a decisive role by mobilizing public opinion and public funds to meet the energy needs of the poorest 3 billion people, thus allowing them to prepare for the challenges of unavoidable climate and eco-system changes.

On Tuesday, the Vatican takes another step toward the release of Pope Francis’s encyclical on climate, energy, ecology and equity.
dotearth.blogs.nytimes.com|By Andrew C. Revkin

NYT today: New Study Links Weather Extremes to Global Warming

Justin Gillis quotes Dr. Eric Fischer: “If efforts to control emissions are unsuccessful, and temperatures by the end of the century rise as much as some experts fear, both heat and precipitation extremes will skyrocket, with human-caused global warming likely to be responsible for half the precipitation extremes and perhaps 90 percent of the heat extremes in that climate, the researchers found.

The change being seen today in precipitation patterns was predicted decades ago, based on the elementary fact that warmer air can hold more moisture. Other researchers have found that the increase is leading to heavier rainstorms across large parts of the United States, with the biggest effect occurring in the Northeast. At the same time, warmer temperatures are worsening the effects of droughts when they do occur, as in California over the last few years.

“The bottom line is that things are not that complicated,” Dr. Knutti said. “You make the world a degree or two warmer, and there will be more hot days. There will be more moisture in the atmosphere, so that must come down somewhere.” ”

Human emissions are responsible for about 75 percent of especially hot days and 18 percent of unusually heavy precipitation, according to a new report.
nytimes.com|By JUSTIN GILLIS

Joe Nocera reports that at least one famous conservative economist supports the Export-Import Bank.

Joe Nocera reports that at least one famous conservative economist supports the Export-Import Bank.
“There is, however, one conservative think tank that has refused to join the crowd: the five-year-old American Action Forum, or A.A.F., co-founded and led by the economist Douglas Holtz-Eakin. Since last May, it has issued a series of reports making the case that the country is better off with the Ex-Im Bank than without it. Given the way apostasy is treated among conservative ideologues, this struck me as courageous.”

A conservative think tank makes the case for the Export-Import Bank.
nytimes.com|By Joe Nocera

Timothy Egan: “a few rich guys (are) trying to buy the next presidential election.

Timothy Egan on the Koch brothers: ” At some point, you would think that average Americans would be appalled by a few rich guys trying to buy the next presidential election. And — hope alert! — you did see a great pushback against the Koches in red-state Montana this month. There, Koch-funded surrogates tried to keep poor people from getting health care, through the Medicaid expansion option of Obamacare. Koch agents were booed at one hearing. And they were shamed at another, for the stark cruelty of two people worth a combined $80 billion dollars trying to deny a basic human decency to people who earn $11,000 a year. Health care is on the way in Montana.”

As a political party of two, the Kochs may end up spending as much money to get their way next year as either of the actual political parties.
nytimes.com|By Timothy Egan

Paul Krugman asks, “So why has the Republican Party experienced a zombie apocalypse?”

Paul Krugman asks, “So why has the Republican Party experienced a zombie apocalypse?”

The Republican presidential hopefuls are resurrecting long-refuted ideas as if they actually worked.
nytimes.com|By Paul Krugman