How to Prosecute Abusive Prosecutors – Brandon Buskey, the New York Times

“WHEN it comes to poor people arrested for felonies in Scott County, Miss., Judge Marcus D. Gordon doesn’t bother with the Constitution. He refuses to appoint counsel until arrestees have been formally charged by an indictment, which means they must languish in jail without legal representation for as long as a year.From Our AdvertisersJudge Gordon has robbed countless individuals of their freedom, locking them away from their loved ones and livelihoods for months on end. (I am the lead lawyer in a class-action suit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union against Scott County and Judge Gordon.) In a recent interview, the judge, who sits on the Mississippi State Circuit Court, was unapologetic about his regime of indefinite detention: “The criminal system is a system of criminals. Sure, their rights are violated.” But, he added, “That’s the hardship of the criminal system.”There are many words to describe the judge’s blunt disregard of the Sixth Amendment right to counsel. Callous. Appalling. Cruel. Here’s another possibility: criminal — liable to prosecution and, if found guilty, prison time.”

Source: How to Prosecute Abusive Prosecutors – The New York Times

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With 18 months left in office, the president has embarked on a new effort to reduce sentences for nonviolent offenders and to revamp prison life. nytimes.com|By PETER BAKER

Great article on Obama’s prison reform initiative by Peter Baker, who reports: “More than 2.2 million Americans are behind bars, and one study found that the size of the state and federal prison population is seven times what it was 40 years ago. Although the United States makes up less than 5 percent of the world’s population, it has more than 20 percent of its prison population.

This has disproportionately affected young Hispanic and African-American men. And many more have been released but have convictions on their records that make it hard to find jobs or to vote.”

With 18 months left in office, the president has embarked on a new effort to reduce sentences for nonviolent offenders and to revamp prison life.
nytimes.com|By PETER BAKER

Justice Reform in the Deep South – NYTimes.com

“Of course, all these states had abysmal conditions to start with. Mississippi imprisons more of its citizens per capita than China and Russia combined. That’s worse than any state except Louisiana, which has not yet managed reforms as broad as its neighbors. Alabama was facing the threat of federal intervention to alleviate its crushingly overcrowded prisons if it didn’t act. And many of these state reforms are far more modest than they should be. Alabama’s prisons, for instance, will still be 40 percent over capacity in five years, even if everything goes as planned. In many parts of Mississippi and Alabama, the lack of funding for public defenders is so acute that people can spend months behind bars before even being indicted.”

via Justice Reform in the Deep South – NYTimes.com.