Opinion | The Pandemic Has Created a Youth Unemployment Crisis. We Can Fix It. – By Collin O’Mara – The New York Times

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Mr. O’Mara is the president and C.E.O. of the National Wildlife Federation.

Credit…Fotosearch/Getty Images

“Nearly 7.7 million American workers younger than 30 are now unemployed and three million dropped out of the labor force in the past month. Combined that’s nearly one in three young workers, by far the highest rate since the country started tracking unemployment by age in 1948.

Nearly 40 percent worked in the devastated retail and food service sectors. And as the most recently hired, young workers are typically the first let go and often the last rehired, especially those of color.

As our country’s leaders consider a range of solutions to address this crisis, there’s one fix that will put millions of young Americans directly to work: a 21st-century version of the Civilian Conservation Corps.

In 1933, when President Franklin Roosevelt created the C.C.C., he was facing, as we are today, the possibility of a lost generation of young people. The conservation-minded president’s idea was to hire young unemployed men for projects in forestry, soil conservation and recreation. By 1942, the 3.4 million participants in “Roosevelt’s Tree Army” had planted more than three billion trees, built hundreds of parks and wildlife refuges and completed thousands of miles of trails and roads.”

Vikings Razed the Forests. Can Iceland Regrow Them? – By HENRY FOUNTAIN – NYT

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The country lost most of its trees long ago. Despite years of replanting, it isn’t making much progress.

By HENRY FOUNTAIN
OCT. 20, 2017
GUNNARSHOLT, Iceland — With his flats of saplings and a red planting tool, Jon Asgeir Jonsson is a foot soldier in the fight to reforest Iceland, working to bring new life to largely barren landscapes.

Jon Asgeir Jonsson, who works for a private forestry association, with larch saplings in western Iceland.
The country lost most of its trees more than a thousand years ago, when Viking settlers took their axes to the forests that covered one-quarter of the countryside. Now Icelanders would like to get some of those forests back, to improve and stabilize the country’s harsh soils, help agriculture and fight climate change.

via Vikings Razed the Forests. Can Iceland Regrow Them? – The New York Times