Birds that once feasted on misfortune are collapsing — part of a broader decline in vultures that illustrates the far-reaching effects of human interventions. nytimes.com|By MARC SANTORA

Sometimes I feel like the guy in the old cartoon, who is holding up a sign that says, The end is near!

Birds that once feasted on misfortune are collapsing — part of a broader decline in vultures that illustrates the far-reaching effects of human interventions.
nytimes.com|By MARC SANTORA
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Another thunderbolt from Saint Nich. Chickens face an awful crucifixion that is unnecessay.

Most Americans don’t want animals killed for food to suffer needlessly. Yet that’s exactly what happens to hundreds of thousands of chickens every year.
nytimes.com|By Nicholas Kristof

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 From PETA: Controlled-atmosphere killing is a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-approved slaughter method that is currently used to kill 75 percent of turkeys and 25 percent of chickens in the United Kingdom and 10 percent of all birds in the European Union. CAK removes oxygen from the birds’ atmosphere while they are still in their transport crates. The birds are not “gassed” (i.e., asphyxiated); they die from lack of oxygen, or anoxia. During this process, the oxygen from the chickens’ environment is removed and slowly replaced with a nonpoisonous gas that puts the birds to sleep while they are still in their transport crates. CAK eliminates the numerous animal welfare, economic, and worker-safety issues associated with electric immobilization:

With CAK, birds are dead before they are removed from their crates, shackled, bled, and scalded in defeathering tanks. Accordingly, these stages do not hurt the birds, damage or contaminate their carcasses, or pose a risk of injury to workers.
With CAK, workers never handle live birds, so there are no chances for abuse. Worker ergonomics and safety are vastly improved. Lights can be kept bright, the air stays clean, and workers do not need to struggle with flapping, scratching, defecating, and vomiting birds.