Teens Are Getting Sick From Products With High THC Levels – The New York Times

“It didn’t smell, which made it easy to hide from her parents. And it was convenient — just press a button and inhale. After the second or third try, she was hooked.

“It was insane. Insane euphoria,” said Elysse, now 18, whose last name is being withheld to protect her privacy. “Everything was moving slowly. I got super hungry. Everything was hilarious.”

But the euphoria eventually morphed into something more disturbing. Sometimes the marijuana would make Elysse feel more anxious, or sad. Another time she passed out in the shower, only to wake up half an hour later.

This was not your average weed. The oil and waxes she bought from dealers were typically about 90 percent THC, the psychoactive component in marijuana. But because these products were derived from cannabis, and nearly everyone she knew was using them, she assumed they were relatively safe. She began vaping multiple times per day. Her parents didn’t find out until about one year later, in 2019.”

Excellent article with good comments, both pro and con THC use and abuse.

Here is a comment that stood out for me.

Alex
Springfield3h ago

It’s the number one cause of reversible erectile dysfunction and male infertility for men under 30 at my urology office. Large increase in patients since state where I practice legalized. Similar to alcohol- a little might promote the mood, a lot – not so much. A generation of guinea pigs having to learn moderation is key to life.

3 Replies110 Recommended

Black Death: A Clue to Where the Plague Originated – The New York Times

“Where and when did the Black Death originate? The question has been asked for centuries and led to heated debate among historians.

Now, a group of researchers reports that it has found the answer in the pulp of teeth from people buried in the 14th century.

Based on their analysis of the preserved genetic material, the researchers report that the Black Death arrived in 1338 or 1339 near Issyk-Kul, a lake in a mountainous area just west of China in what is now Kyrgyzstan. The plague first infected people in a small, nearby settlement of traders eight years before it devastated Eurasia, killing 60 percent of its victims.”

Coffee Drinking Linked to Lower Risk of Dying, New Study Finds – The New York Times

“That morning cup of coffee may be linked to a lower risk of dying, researchers from a study published Monday in The Annals of Internal Medicine concluded. Those who drank 1.5 to 3.5 cups of coffee per day, even with a teaspoon of sugar, were up to 30 percent less likely to die during the study period than those who didn’t drink coffee. Those who drank unsweetened coffee were 16 to 21 percent less likely to die during the study period, with those drinking about three cups per day having the lowest risk of death when compared with noncoffee drinkers.

Researchers analyzed coffee consumption data collected from the U.K. Biobank, a large medical database with health information from people across Britain. They analyzed demographic, lifestyle and dietary information collected from more than 170,000 people between the ages of 37 and 73 over a median follow-up period of seven years. The mortality risk remained lower for people who drank both decaffeinated and caffeinated coffee. The data was inconclusive for those who drank coffee with artificial sweeteners.

That morning cup of coffee may be linked to a lower risk of dying, researchers from a study published Monday in The Annals of Internal Medicine concluded. Those who drank 1.5 to 3.5 cups of coffee per day, even with a teaspoon of sugar, were up to 30 percent less likely to die during the study period than those who didn’t drink coffee. Those who drank unsweetened coffee were 16 to 21 percent less likely to die during the study period, with those drinking about three cups per day having the lowest risk of death when compared with noncoffee drinkers.

Researchers analyzed coffee consumption data collected from the U.K. Biobank, a large medical database with health information from people across Britain. They analyzed demographic, lifestyle and dietary information collected from more than 170,000 people between the ages of 37 and 73 over a median follow-up period of seven years. The mortality risk remained lower for people who drank both decaffeinated and caffeinated coffee. The data was inconclusive for those who drank coffee with artificial sweeteners.”

Another example of an excellent article in the NYT, where the comments were still better than the article itself.

Jay Moskovitz
Portland, OregonJune 1

@Brian Interesting. When my kids were still living with me, THEIR risk of death was extremely high before my first cup of coffee.

In Reply to Brian468 Recommended

David commented June 1

David
CaliforniaJune 1

As I recall, the risk of dying is 100%.

5 Replies313 Recommended

M.F. commented June 1

M.F.

Let’s face it: coffee not only adds more days to your life, it also adds more life to your days! Hail coffee, o, how I love thee!

1 Reply306 Recommended

Brian commented June 1

Brian
QueensJune 1

Makes sense, anecdotally/informally. Every morning, I am convinced my risk of death is extremely high prior to my first cup of coffee.

4 Replies239 Recommended

A Complete Guide to Tick Identification and Prevention – The New York Times

The Ticks That Can Make You Sick

“Only two types of ticks — blacklegged ticks (sometimes called deer ticks) and Western blacklegged ticks — can transmit Lyme-causing bacteria. But these and other types of ticks can harbor other diseases that can cause illness, so it’s important to know how to identify them if you get bitten.

Here are six of the most common ticks you might come across in the United States, including those that are most likely to bite you, and what they look like in three of their life stages: larva, nymph and adult. For most species, adult female ticks are the most likely to feed on humans, but many nymphs can bite and cause illness too.”

Akiko Awasaki | A Nasal Vaccine for Covid Could Prevent Infections – The New York Times

“. . . . . The Covid-19 vaccines authorized for use today were developed at unprecedented speed and surpassed expectations in how well they worked. The billions of people who are protected by them have avoided severe symptoms, hospitalization and deaths. These vaccines are a scientific success beyond measure.

And yet they could be even better.

The enemy has evolved, and the world needs next-generation vaccines to respond. This includes vaccines that prevent coronavirus infections altogether.

When the early mRNA vaccines were first authorized in December 2020, the world was dealing with a different kind of pandemic. The dominant strain circulating had a relatively low capacity to spread between people. At that time, not only did the mRNA vaccines provide strong protection against severe disease and death, but they were also highly protective against infections and the virus’s spread as well.

But SARS-CoV-2 continued mutating, and in doing so it has given rise to variants that are more contagious and highly capable at skirting around protective antibodies, causing widespread infections, despite ever growing levels of immunity from vaccines and prior infections. Thankfully, after the booster shot, the mRNA vaccines are still very effective at preventing hospitalizations and deaths, including against the highly contagious Omicron variant.

So, one may ask, if we can eliminate much of the severe disease and fatality risk through a combination of existing vaccines and treatments, why should we worry about infections?

Even mild infections can develop into long Covid, with people suffering long-lasting, debilitating symptoms. Data also suggests that groups like older adults who have been vaccinated but haven’t received their boosters may continue to be at a higher risk for the worst outcomes of Covid-19. Regular infections can pose substantial disruptions to people’s lives, affecting their ability to work and keep their children in school. There’s also no guarantee that people infected with Omicron will remain protected against infections with future variants.”

If you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus – Harvard Health

What should I do if I think I or my child may have a COVID-19 infection?

First, call your doctor or pediatrician for advice.

If you do not have a doctor and you are concerned that you or your child may have COVID-19, contact your local board of health. They can direct you to the best place for testing and treatment in your area. Over-the-counter tests may also be available at your local pharmacy or grocery store.

If you do test positive and either have no symptoms or can recover at home, you will still need to

  • isolate at home for five days
  • if you have no symptoms or your symptoms are improving after five days, you can discontinue isolation and leave your home
  • continue to wear a mask around others for five additional days.

If you have a fever, continue to isolate at home until you no longer have a fever.

Source: If you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus – Harvard Health

How Much Sugar Is in a Glass of Wine? – The New York Times

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, a five-ounce glass of red table wine typically contains about 0.9 grams of total sugar, while a glass of chardonnay contains about 1.4 grams. A sweet dessert wine, typically served in a smaller two- to three-ounce glass, contains as much as 7 grams of sugar. Depending on where the wine was made, the total may include added sugar or sugar from unfermented grape juice, along with the sugar that occurs naturally in the grapes.

The 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend limiting added sugar intake to no more than 10 percent of daily calories, which is about 12 teaspoons, or 50 grams. The American Heart Association recommends limiting intake even further: no more than six teaspoons (about 25 grams, or 100 calories) per day for women, and no more than nine teaspoons (36 grams, 150 calories) per day for men.

When Covid Enters the House, What Should We Do? – The New York Times

Though I have been writing about Covid-19 for The New York Times for the past two years, I still felt overwhelmed when my son was sent home from school sick in mid-March and tested positive. Suddenly, I was in a cluttered New York City apartment with my husband, first grader and third grader, a lot of virus particles and no clear plan.

We did try to isolate positive from negative family members at first and wear masks, but we all got sick anyway. The rolling series of infections lasted for about three weeks, and my symptoms included a 102-degree fever, sore throat and congestion. We were all fully vaccinated, and my husband and I were boosted.

Opinion | We Study Virus Evolution. Here’s Where We Think the Coronavirus Is Going. – The New York Times

By Sarah Cobey, Jesse Bloom and Tyler Starr and Nathaniel Lash

Dr. Cobey studies the interaction of immunity, virus evolution and transmission at the University of Chicago. Dr. Bloom and Dr. Starr study virus evolution at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. Mr. Lash is a graphics editor for Opinion.

“As scientists who study how viruses evolve, we are often asked about the future of the coronavirus. Will it go away? Get worse? Fade into the background of our lives? Become seasonal like the flu?

Here’s what we know: The virus’s Omicron variant was significantly more infectious and more resistant to vaccines than the original strain that first emerged in Wuhan, China. There’s no reason, at least biologically, that the virus won’t continue to evolve. The coronavirus variants that have emerged thus far sample only a fraction of the genetic space that is most likely available for evolutionary exploration.”

Covid-19: Long Term Brain Injury – William A. Haseltine – Forbes.com 

This story is part of a larger mosaic of stories on Post-Acute Sequelae of Covid-19 (PASC), also known as Long Covid. Read part one of this series on loss of smell after Covid-19.

“SARS-CoV-2 infection can damage many organs other than the lungs. The most troubling is damage to the brain. A series of recent studies document long term brain-damage in as many as one quarter of all those infected regardless of the severity of the initial disease. Those numbers are daunting considering that an estimated 140 million Americans have been infected by SARS-CoV-2. Symptoms, such as brain fog, fatigue, depression and a host of other maladies, may be mild or incapacitating. Several studies warn that treatment of those with long term brain injury will strain the healthcare care system for years to come. Understanding the origin and treatment of Covid-19 related brain injury is a high priority for medical science.

A recent study by Frontera et al. of the NYU Grossman School of Medicine evaluated the cognitive function of Covid-19 patients six months after they were hospitalized for Covid-19. To their surprise, over 90% of their total cohort reported at least one neurological symptom. Among those that had not experienced neurological complications while hospitalized, 88% reported new cognitive symptoms.”

Source: Covid-19: Long Term Brain Injury