How 2 M.T.A. Decisions Pushed the Subway Into Crisis – The New York Times

“By now, New York City commuters are familiar with the wait. We descend from the bitter cold or the stifling heat to find subway platforms teeming with other bodies trying to make it to work on time. Delays ripple through the system, so there’s barely room to squeeze into the next train that arrives.

For years, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority told us that rising ridership and overcrowding were to blame. Yet ridership actually stayed mostly flat from 2013 to 2018 as delays rose, and the authority recently acknowledged that overcrowding was not at fault.

Instead, two decisions made by the M.T.A. years ago — one to slow down trains and another that tried to improve worker safety — appear to have pushed the subway system into its current crisis. And there’s no easy fix.”

David Lindsay Jr.

Hamden, CT 

Wow. Great Article, thank you. If you can identify the sources of the problem, you would suspect that competent people could fix their mistakes. Two years ago, I revisited Paris, and rode again on a really good subway system. How do they do it? Might be related to their national $7 dollar? a gallon gas tax. That democracy chooses to have well funded, well run, public transportation systems. This April, I visited Washington DC, and was impressed by the subway there. NYC, and I have heard, Albany, have managed to turn their once show case subway into a national disgrace and a laughing stock of incompetence. Is this what you want to be known for? Maybe states like my Connecticut, can turn this into part of our marketing strategy for attracting new business. Image a new marketing campaign, “(Insert Any State), where you you don’t have to ride the NYC subway!” David Lindsay Jr. is the author of “The Tay Son Rebellion, Historical Fiction of Eighteenth-century Vietnam,” and blogs at TheTaySonRebellion.com and InconvenientNews.wordpress.com