Mr. Trump Goes After the Inspectors – The New York Times

“Every major federal agency and program has an inspector general, a nonpartisan, independent official whose staff investigates cases of wasteful spending, criminal activity, employee misconduct and plain bad management. These are watchdogs with real teeth.”

Sad. Here is a good comment:

Paul King

USA 12 minutes ago

What if the Gambino crime family had the power fire detectives and FBI agents investigating their many illegal activities?

What if they could have cut the budgets of police and prosecutors who served as the foot soldiers on the streets and in the court proceedings that took the stopped bad guys who undermine society?

In other words, what if they could starve away, with budget cuts, or flat out remove the watchdogs and public servants who made it hard for them, and associates who feed their pockets and maintain their criminal empire?

Well, thankfully they could not.

But the Trump Crime Family can.

In matters personal/political (think Russia investigation and the desperate act of firing Comey) or affecting friends in the energy or financial industry who can repay with riches (political cash and, who knows with these people, monetary kickbacks), they would love to systematic let the fox guard the hen houses that affect us all. Or have no guard at all.

Why would bad actors – and their cronies in high places – want anyone watching them? Especially when you can now fire people and cut budgets.

Think.

Then remove as many of these anti-American people as possible by voting in November 2018 and 2020.
Before they ruin everything.

The Law School Debt Crisis – Editorial at The New York Times

Good piece, too many law schools are taking lots of money from students that will never qualify to practice law, leaving them drowning in debt. The editorial ends:
‘If fewer federal dollars were streaming into law schools’ coffers and more were directed to fund legal services organizations, the legal profession — and the American legal system as a whole — would be better for it.’

Source: The Law School Debt Crisis – The New York Times