GEAS_Jun_12_Carrying_Capacity.pdf

Here is the article mentioned in the comment to Nicholas Kristof’s good news.

“The size of Earth is enormous from the perspective of a single individual. Standing at the edge of an ocean or the top of a mountain, looking across the vast expanse of Earth’s water, forests, grasslands, lakes or deserts, it is hard to conceive of limits to the planet’s natural resources. But we are not a single person; we are now sevenbillion people and we are adding one million more people roughly every 4.8 days (2). Before 1950 no one on Earth had lived through a doubling of the human population but now some people have experienced a tripling in their lifetime (3). So many people now inhabit the planet with so much impact that scientists have coined a new word to describe our time, the Anthropocene Epoch (4).”

Source: GEAS_Jun_12_Carrying_Capacity.pdf

When Humans Declared War on Fish — NYTimes

“Taken collectively, the rise of postwar fishing technology meant that the global reported catch rose from some 15 million metric tons at war’s end to 85 million metric tons today — the equivalent, in weight, of the entire human population at the turn of the 20th century, removed from the sea each and every year.

Only the turn of the third millennium saw a new kind of reprieve, this time not caused by human adversity, but by the insight that we need to make peace with other species as well. Growing signs of exhaustion and failure in global fisheries made humans reconsider the totality of their assault.”

Victory in 1945 meant a new era of violence against ocean life.
nytimes.com|By Paul Greenberg and Boris Worm

Nicholas Kristof calls for saving the Rohingya boat people. Can we save them, and also stop the Sitxth Great Extinction?

Thank you Saint Nicholas for challenging us. I have to admit I fall short. I am almost obsessed with concern about climate change, which is caused probably by over-population. I’m reading the Sixth Extinction, by Elizabeth Kolbert, which is a book about how seven billion people are causing a giant extinction of species, as many kills as during the other great extinction periods.
Al Gore reported, it took almost 200,000 years for humans to reach one billion, around 1776. Humans then doubled to two billion people at the end of World War II, just 169 years later . Seventy years later, today we have jumped to seven billion humans. It is awkward to press countries like Malasia into accepting other nations’ refugees, when they have their share of over-population and ecological stress.
It seems right that we help organize the Nations of the world to alleviate refugee suffering and death, but there needs some recognition that too many people is a main cause of resource scarcity and tribal tension world wide. I am embarrassed to admit, that I am more concerned with the extinction of the African elephant, than with the saving of Rohingya boat people. Though I care about both, which is more pressing? Perhaps we could help the Rohingya, if we are willing to accept as refugees our share of their displaced numbers, whereas refusing them, forces them to work on their situation where they live. You are probably right, that there must be a civilized solution, but the most efficient would include keeping these people in the lands they come from.

American and Asian officials seem determined to avert their eyes as the toll climbs in the Rohingya refugee crisis.
nytimes.com|By Nicholas Kristof

China plans to damn all the great rivers of Tibet. Neighbors cry.

Inconvenient News Worldwide

Important piece by Michael Buckley, NYT. The U.S. should study these issues from the perspective of China’s neighbors downstream. The most popular comment to date:
Michael
Zhanjiang, PRC      “The water wars of the 21st century are just beginning and the countries with the best militaries will prevail. Sadly hardly a govt. in the world is willing to discuss the real problem which is that there are just way too many people. Closer to home, take the situation in California where despite the drought we are still adding more homes and people and the govt. has as of yet to come with any sensible plans for dealing the the desertification that is occurring.”

It might be time to start a trade war with China to support Tibetan independence, and a China-free South China Sea. It might be good to start by finding a new name for the sea…

View original post 56 more words

China plans to damn all the great rivers of Tibet. Neighbors cry.

Important piece by Michael Buckley, NYT. The U.S. should study these issues from the perspective of China’s neighbors downstream. The most popular comment to date:
Michael
Zhanjiang, PRC      “The water wars of the 21st century are just beginning and the countries with the best militaries will prevail. Sadly hardly a govt. in the world is willing to discuss the real problem which is that there are just way too many people. Closer to home, take the situation in California where despite the drought we are still adding more homes and people and the govt. has as of yet to come with any sensible plans for dealing the the desertification that is occurring.”

It might be time to start a trade war with China to support Tibetan independence, and a China-free South China Sea. It might be good to start by finding a new name for the sea between Vietnam and the Philippines and Malaysia. We could ask them to pick a name they all three can agree on.
This will also go to my other blog: www.InconvenientNews.wordpress.com.

China intends to keep building dams on Tibet’s waterways, ignoring the people of countries downstream.
nytimes.com|By Michael Buckley

Jason Stanley has some important points about Muslim fanatics. Here are more.

Very complicated, but I think that although I recommended some of the criticisms in the Commnets of the NYT of Jason Stanley, he has some important points. Just as he felt oppressed by a soldier pointing an automatic rifle at him for looking Arab, the foreign Muslims in France are oppressed by their sense of exclusion, even though they get free health care. As a disciple of Paul Krugman, I see that the unemployment rate in France, and most of the world, for these angry young men is just too high, and these rampages are perhaps a ramification of austerity budgets and programs.

There is a difference in France between mocking the Pope and mocking the Prophet Muhammad.
opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com|By Jason Stanley