What We Know About Hillary Clinton’s Private Email Server – The New York Times

By ALICIA PARLAPIANO UPDATED SEPT. 2, 2016

“A federal judge on August 22 ordered the State Department to plan for the releaseof nearly 15,000 emails uncovered by the F.B.I. during its investigation into Hillary Clinton’s handling of classified information on a private email domain as secretary of state. In July, The F.B.I. recommended no charges against Mrs. Clinton and said that there was no evidence that those emails were “intentionally deleted,” but called her handling of her email at the State Department “extremely careless.” ”

Source: What We Know About Hillary Clinton’s Private Email Server – The New York Times

I was particularly interested in:

“January 2016

The State Department announces that it will not release 22 emails that contain “top secret” material. The classifications of the emails were increased after the fact; they were not marked when they were sent. Three days later, the first presidential primary is held in Iowa.”

This last paragraph could mean several things. Whether Hillary Clinton was being careless or not, depends on a classification that had not occurred yet. Since we do not have all the facts, we should bow to the authorities who investigated these actions. The investigators decided unanimously that Clinton had not done anything that deserved punishment, and some investigators, like the Republican appointed FBI director said she was sometimes egregiously careless, but he recommended against pressing any charges.

What appears in these articles, is another story, that the great bureaucracies of Washington DC have their own turf wars, split between Republican vs Democrat political factions. Also, the determination of what is secret, or top secret, and what is not, is complex, non-scientific, and frequently political. In this complex and difficult set of subjects, Trump and the Hillary Haters are interested in smearing Hillary, since it is very difficult for non experts in the investigation lab to understand the complexities.

Over 40 years of following and writing about the cold war and foreign policy, I have read perhaps a dozen times that the subject of classified material is extremely controversial. Inside the government, the various factions are rarely in agreement as to what should be classified, and why. A random of example of disagreement, The Pentagon Papers was classified top secret. It was leaked do the NY Times, by Daniel Ellsberg, one of the co-authors of the report, because as a citizens and whistle blower, he thought the American people should know that the government was not telling the truth in its press releases of what it thought and knew about the poor outcomes occurring in the Vietnam War.

The prosecution of Ellsberg and the NYTimes, I think I recall made it to the Supreme Court, which decided against the government, and in part, that the classification system was being abused to keep the US public stupid about the mishandling of a difficult war by the government.