Opinion | Winners and Losers of the Democratic Debate – The New York Times

“Welcome to Opinion’s commentary for the Feb. 19 Democratic presidential candidate debate in Las Vegas. In this special feature, Times Opinion writers rank the candidates on a scale of 1 to 10: 1 means the candidate probably didn’t belong on the stage and should probably drop out; 10 means it’s on, President Trump. Here’s what our columnists and contributors thought about the debate.

Read what our columnists and contributors thought of the Feb. 8 debate.

Elizabeth Warren8.4/10Average score”

 

 

David Lindsay Jr.
Hamden, CT | NYT Comment:
Actually, while I’ve been a Biden supporter because of old Nate Cohn polls, my partner and I thought Michael Bloomberg won the debate. Read carefully what Daniel McCarthy wrote in this artice: “(5/10) — He isn’t ashamed of what he is, distasteful as that may be to other Democrats, particularly where his wealth and ugly history with women and minorities are concerned. His lack of defensiveness might let him brazen his way through the primaries as Trump did in the G.O.P.” We saw a sad but determined patriot and wise elder, deeply concerned about Trump. He showed up unprepared possibly on purpose. He showed up unarmed. We did not enjoy the others trying to cut him, in their fear of his power, resume and fortune.
I enjoyed listening to a former Obama political consultant on NPR this morning, who noted that Bloomberg showed up to take all this shit, before two primaries he isn’t in, to get it all out before the next debate, which he will prep for, and which will be before super Tuesday. Based on what we saw last night, I now expect Michael Bloomberg to prevail. This will not be a bad thing in my view, since I fear that neither Sanders or Warren will be able to win the electoral college, since every Republican I have interviewed, has said they would vote for Trump over either of these two, who they see as extremists.

 

 

Opinion | Winners and Losers of the Democratic Debate – The New York Times

“Welcome to Opinion’s commentary for the Jan. 14 Democratic presidential candidate debate in Des Moines. In this special feature, Times Opinion writers rank the candidates on a scale of 1 to 10: 1 means the candidate probably didn’t belong on the stage and should probably drop out; 10 means it’s on, President Trump. Here’s what our columnists and contributors thought about the debate.”

 

 

David Lindsay Jr.
Hamden, CT | NYT Comment
I enjoyed the panel’s observations and many of the comments. I agree with one paragraph of one commenter, that there should have been more focus on who could deliver the six red or purple swing states that allowed Trump to beat Hillary Clinton. Warren might be the most exciting senior, but she lost and Joe Biden won against Trump, in the last poll of these six states run by Nate Cohn, and analysed by David Leonhardt. I suspect that Bernie did tell Warren that a woman can’t win. He was telling her something that the polls and elections point to. I might have said that to her, not to diminish her brilliance and leadership, but to remind her of the weakness of our weird form of democracy, where small red states have more say than populous blue ones. My ticket remain Joe Biden for President, Pete Buttigieg for VP. What a magnificent way for Pete to build bridges with the black voters. If Joe Biden doen’t agree to give Elizabeth Warren any cabinet position she wants, I might have to reconsider my position, and let Trump boil our children to death. These are all such fine people, I would like to see a Team of Rivals in the government, who ever saves us all from certain damnation in the form literally of hellfire and high water. All subject to revision, base on the next polls on the critical 6 swing states.

Opinion | Winners and Losers of the Democratic Debate – The New York Times

Welcome to Opinion’s commentary for the Dec. 19 Democratic presidential candidate debate in Los Angeles. In this special feature, Times Opinion writers rank the candidates on a scale of 1 to 10: 1 means the candidate probably didn’t belong on the stage and should probably drop out; 10 means it’s on, President Trump. Here’s what our columnists and contributors thought about the debate.

Read what our columnists and contributors thought of the November debate.

Amy Klobuchar7.1/10Average score

 

David Lindsay:

The best debate so far last night, and I really enjoy reading this Times summary of pundits weighing in. I agreed mostly with the votes of Nicholas Kristof, for which I am pleased and proud. I thought Andrew Yang won the opening, and Amy Klobushar came in second. I screamed soon after, why is the  background of the stage moving! News Hour sliding across the background, and Politico– what nonesense. On fracking job loss, Joe Biden was terrific and on climate change. Buttigieg was brilliant on China, so was Styer! And Biden, I hope he does move 60% of our Navy to the South China Sea. That will protect our allies in the Pacific. Yang kept up, warning us to keep up in AI and tech. Bernie started the downward slide, wanting to protect all 11 million illegal immigrants here. The others piled on. I felt the Dem lose the election to Trump over that one issue, that so many Americans care about. The Dems don’t get it. Most Americans don’t want illegals to ever go to the front of the line. No one talked about Japan, and protected guest workers. If the Dems run on protecting all illlegal immigrants, they will lose the election as well as the planet.

Hopefully, the moderates will prevail. I am satified with my current choices, supporting Biden with Buttigieg as his VP. Klobushar is deserving, but Hillary showed that too many mid westerners don’t want a woman as president. Liz and Bernie would get trounced in the electoral college.

Opinion | Winners and Losers of the Democratic Debate – The New York Times

About the authors

“Charles Blow, Jamelle Bouie, Gail Collins, Ross Douthat, Maureen Dowd, Michelle Goldberg, Nicholas Kristof, David Leonhardt, and Bret Stephens are Times columnists.

Liz Mair, a strategist for campaigns by Scott Walker, Roy Blunt, Rand Paul, Carly Fiorina and Rick Perry, is the founder and president of Mair Strategies.

Gracy Olmstead is a writer who contributes to The American Conservative, The Week, The Washington Post and other publications.

Sarah Vowell, a contributing opinion writer, is the author of “The Wordy Shipmates” and “Lafayette in the Somewhat United States.”

Peter Wehner a senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, served in the previous three Republican administrations and is a contributing opinion writer, as well as the author of “The Death of Politics: How to Heal Our Frayed Republic After Trump.”

Will Wilkinson is a contributing opinion writer and the vice president for research at the Niskanen Center.”